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"Wood to Plastic (styrene) Adhesive Options?" Topic


18 Posts

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3,872 hits since 6 Apr 2011
©1994-2014 Bill Armintrout
Comments or corrections?

Early morning writer06 Apr 2011 10:29 p.m. PST

What is your experience with melding styrene plastic to wood – both painted and not – to each other? Best recommended adhesive and why?

Thanks for the assistance.

Colin Hagreen06 Apr 2011 10:45 p.m. PST

Plastic to wood – no chance of a chemical bond, has to be a surface bond. Epoxy glue – Araldite or similar – would be my weapon of choice here. You could go for a superglue, but I prefer the slight flexibility you get from an epoxy…

Colin

Space Monkey06 Apr 2011 10:55 p.m. PST

Yeah, epoxy… lots of roughing up of both surfaces.

aecurtis Fezian Inactive Member06 Apr 2011 11:16 p.m. PST

There's a classic adhesive for laminating dissimilar materials.

Allen

bsrlee07 Apr 2011 2:25 a.m. PST

A variety of things will work, so long as it will bond with wood AND has a solvent that etches/melts styrene plastic. Contact cement, some balsa cements (ones you should not sniff), some polyurethanes. For mechanical glues like epoxy you should use a solvent to clean the surface as styrene can have various release agents left on it.

Most of these will also remove paint too….

Paintbeast Inactive Member07 Apr 2011 4:01 a.m. PST

Most of the time I just use the CA glue that is handy on my desk for quick projects. One drop of CA on the wood fills the grain, then a second drop to glue the two together. Epoxy is the better choice though…

floating white bear07 Apr 2011 5:07 a.m. PST

For thin sheets bonded to wood I use the Testors liquid plastic solvent/glue. It will disolve the plastic and provide a bond to the wood. Alternately a small amount of contact cement will do. The contact cement will "melt" the plastic sheet and distort it if you use too much so test first. For details, I would try the CA. Rob.

corporalpat07 Apr 2011 5:12 a.m. PST

I use a glue called E6000 that I get at a craft store called Pat Catan's (in the US). Haven't tried looking online for it. It will glue most anything to anything. I use it for all kinds of things, but mostly basing my figs, and have had no problems. It works very well on metal to wood or metal to metal bonds so styrene to wood should be no problem. It is strong, reasonably quick drying and flexible. I love the stuff!

pphalen Inactive Member07 Apr 2011 6:02 a.m. PST

I would use Liquid Nails – Projects (or something similar).
One of primary use of this one is to glue insulating foam (pink or blue) to wood and concrete.

Early morning writer07 Apr 2011 7:37 a.m. PST

Thanks for all the replies – more are certainly welcome. Anyone else try the liquid nails idea beside pphalen? Foam and plastic have different properties but I'd love for this to work because the overall surface to be covered is large although the individual pieces are smaller (2" x 4" up to about 3" x 6" and some in between – multiplied many, many times). The liquid nails appeals on a cost of coverage basis so, if it works, that will probably be adhesive of choice. Does it thin down well? Also, does it fill gaps?

Again, thanks for all the replies, received and still to come.

pphalen Inactive Member07 Apr 2011 8:56 a.m. PST

Pink insulating foam (at least the Corning Owens) is polystyrene!
As far as thinning it, I wouldn't know, since I always used it straight out of the tube. It is, however, quite compressible, and you only need a little bit for really, really good adhesion.

You can get it in caulk gun tubes, or I have seen them in individual squeeze tubes. The amount of adhesive you apply, can be very easily metered by the size of the hole on the tube (this is where I prefer the caulk gun, since it is much easier (for me) to apply an even bead, versus squeezing a tube by hand). And it fills gaps pretty well, with negligible shrinkage on curing.

SteelPenguin07 Apr 2011 9:49 a.m. PST

my father in law on his railway, uses standard plsti weld but realy sloshes it on, the plastic melts and bondsinto all the surface detail of the wood.

Space Monkey07 Apr 2011 4:31 p.m. PST

For a large project Liquid Nails does seem like it would work better… I've used it on large sculptures for a combination of adhesive/mechanical bonding and it worked really well, took a beating.

1815Guy Supporting Member of TMP08 Apr 2011 9:09 a.m. PST

My adhesive of choice for wood to plastic is a contact adhesive such as Bostik. Ive also used 'liquid nails', such as No more Nails with no problem, although its not cheap & the usual dispenser isnt really geared to modelling sized jobs!

Epoxy resin such as Araldite is lifetime bonding!! The wood will disintegrate or the plastic will break before the bond does! Only use it if you never ever want to change your mind!!

Anything painted will have a weaker bond, of course. Make sure you are sticking the items together, not the layers of paint together!

Jeff01 Inactive Member08 Apr 2011 11:25 a.m. PST

EMW: "Anyone else try the liquid nails idea beside pphalen? Foam and plastic have different properties but I'd love for this to work because the overall surface to be covered is large although the individual pieces are smaller (2" x 4" up to about 3" x 6" and some in between multiplied many, many times). The liquid nails appeals on a cost of coverage basis so, if it works, that will probably be adhesive of choice. Does it thin down well? Also, does it fill gaps?"

I'd pick a construction adhesive (Liquid Nails is a particular brand) that specifically mentions bonding foam. I'm pretty sure one of the PLnnn offerings fits the bill. These are going to be relatively thick and I don't think you can thin them down -- put I've never tried. Since they are thick they can fill (small) gaps between the items being glued.

John Treadaway02 May 2011 5:35 a.m. PST

Gorilla glue is very impressive in my experience but you have to clamp the items together (I have used strong tape in the past) watch out for the foaming effect.

John T

GROSSMAN Supporting Member of TMP11 May 2011 5:05 p.m. PST

I vote Liquid Nailas as well works on almost everything and is flexible.

6milPhil12 May 2011 3:10 p.m. PST

I second John T's recommendation of Gorilla glue, but only once you've got the hang of it.

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