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"foldable bow or crossbow, for real?" Topic


13 Posts

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1,879 hits since 8 Jan 2011
©1994-2014 Bill Armintrout
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ghostdog08 Jan 2011 2:57 p.m. PST

as ever, please excuse my english.

I have seen a foldable bow in the smallville tv show, carried by green arrow. Of course, i know that it was only a cgi effect.

I saw a foldable crossbow, too, in the "guillermo tell" tv show..

I am curious about if there is any way of building one of this in the real world… I just like the concept for a "real world" superheroe setting…

The problem is to unfold the weapon ready to fire.. I donīt see any way to do this with a bow…

Twisted Metal Inactive Member08 Jan 2011 3:16 p.m. PST

Modern bows are just a complex series of levers and pulleys, so you could maybe imagine flicking a release switch and having the arms snap into place, though not sure whether it'd be technically possible. link

Personal logo elsyrsyn Supporting Member of TMP08 Jan 2011 3:41 p.m. PST

There are plenty of bows (take-down bows, I believe they're called) with limbs that are removable for transport. I see no reason why they could not be mounted to the riser with some sort of pivot and locking cam instead of the bolts that are commonly used.

Doug

Lion in the Stars08 Jan 2011 6:45 p.m. PST

The limbs of compound bows are physically bolted onto the riser (the part with the handgrip). I have seen take-down crossbows, where the stave is easily removable from the stock, but a quick-release bow would be tough…

You'd either be fighting the full force of the bowstave, or the folding mechanism would have to be strong enough to overcome both the preload on the stave, and the force of the bow itself. That's a pretty tough latching mechanism, but I'd bet someone has built one or is trying to build one.

ScoutII Inactive Member08 Jan 2011 9:18 p.m. PST

link

The problem is to unfold the weapon ready to fire.. I donīt see any way to do this with a bow…

The majority of the force is going in one direction. If it collapses in a different direction – that stress on the pivot point in that other direction should be significantly less.

If you look at the link I posted, there is a good sized screw that goes through limbs and into the riser. Using that as the pivot – a locking mechanism could be used (sort of like they use on folding tables to keep them from folding back up when in use) in order to keep the limbs in the extended position. As long as you pivot is strong enough (not hard…most people would be hard pressed to strain even a Grade 5 fastener) you shouldn't have many problems. The pivot needs to be loose enough to move…but tight enough to not slap and crack the limb when the arrow is fired.

That said – most of them are not designed as quick flip open devices. You generally tighten down the limbs when you are ready to shoot.

Personal logo Parzival Supporting Member of TMP08 Jan 2011 9:22 p.m. PST

The old Roman artillery bow (a ballista) essentially had a "folding" bow arm, as the "arms" were mounted in torsion coils and swung from nearly full back to horizontal (or even forward) when the bow was released. (I've seen one modern reconstruction that had the arms swing inward and forward rather than outside. Weird…)

A college friend of mine had an interesting "crossbow" which had no bow arms at all, but a spring system that cocked with a slide (like a pump shotgun). Very strange weapon.

ScoutII Inactive Member08 Jan 2011 9:27 p.m. PST

A college friend of mine had an interesting "crossbow" which had no bow arms at all, but a spring system that cocked with a slide (like a pump shotgun). Very strange weapon.

Sounds like the speargun I use when in the Gulf for spearfishing.

link

Sven Lugar Inactive Member08 Jan 2011 11:27 p.m. PST

DaVinci designed a crossbow that would fit in the space of a brick. It wasn't a quick load or quick set-up but it did fold.

Andrew Beasley Inactive Member09 Jan 2011 3:03 a.m. PST

Many years ago I was an archer for a hobby and my bow (traditional long bow style) collapsed into three for storage and transport but took 3-5 mins to re-assemble (longer with sights and stabilisers).

You can get cross-bows where the arms fold in link

But for small ones have look at YouTube link

Andrew
Main site: blog.kings-sleep.me.uk

Former Member Account Inactive Member09 Jan 2011 5:07 a.m. PST

After watching James Bond assemble a gun from from a pen and lighter I think you could convince me for sci-fi tech a telescopic style bow. But keeping the string from tangling would be tough.

Personal logo elsyrsyn Supporting Member of TMP09 Jan 2011 8:09 a.m. PST

After watching James Bond assemble a gun from from a pen and lighter

Actually, I believe that was Francisco Scaramanga, portrayed by Christopher Lee.

Doug

Former Member Account Inactive Member09 Jan 2011 9:30 a.m. PST

Of course the Man withe Golden Gun.

Personal logo Klebert L Hall Supporting Member of TMP09 Jan 2011 10:03 a.m. PST

You can certainly make them, but readying them for use is not rapid.
-Kle.

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