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"The Spanish Army in Nueva Espaņa (Mexico)" Topic


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600 hits since 21 Apr 2009
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Saginaw21 Apr 2009 3:36 p.m. PST

The recent topic begun by TMPer "Chouan" got me interested in the Spanish colonial army of Nueva Espaņa, of which I've always had a "back burner" interest (since it sometimes spills over into Texan subjects). A quick Google search produced the following:

link

"Grito de Dolores", anyone? grin

The Gray Ghost21 Apr 2009 4:39 p.m. PST

No thanks I'm not a big fan of grits no matter how well Dolores makes them evil grin

Saginaw21 Apr 2009 5:14 p.m. PST

Thanks, Shecky! wink

SECURITY MINISTER CRITTER Inactive Member21 Apr 2009 5:17 p.m. PST

They left in 1821.

"Grito de Dolores"
No thanks I'm not a big fan of grits no matter how well Dolores makes them

I think that means "screams of pain"

Corkonian22 Apr 2009 4:45 a.m. PST

I am very interested in the uniforms of New Spain, especially in the 1810 to 1821 period. I had found this site, but unfortunately my Spanish is inadequate for it.
For example, a post in February 2008 featured some contemporary (I think) illustrations of infantry in dark blue coats and round hats, and cavalry in a lighter blue, also in round hats. Do these represent Spanish Royalist forces, or rebels?
Also, to what degree did Spanish forces in Mexcio dress similarly to the Peninsular Spanish forces? Would their uniforms have been somewhat behind the times, given that Spain was coping with a French invasion at this time, and new uniforms for Mexico were probably not a priority?

Thanks anyone who can help.

Jeffersonian Inactive Member22 Apr 2009 8:47 a.m. PST

I have some books on the period, but unfortunately I don't have them with me. As far as Mexican uniforms being behind the times and depending for supplies on an embattled Spain, Mexico could probably provide for itself. It was an extremely wealthy colony, rich with silver and a crossroads for trade between the Phillippines and Europe. To what extent the latest uniforms would have made it into the frontiers of California, Arizona, New Mexico or Texas is another story.

Saginaw22 Apr 2009 9:40 a.m. PST

For example, a post in February 2008 featured some contemporary (I think) illustrations of infantry in dark blue coats and round hats, and cavalry in a lighter blue, also in round hats. Do these represent Spanish Royalist forces, or rebels?

Most likely the Spanish Royalists, Corkonian, since the rebels would've been dressed in more traditional "working clothes", such as a white cotton tunic and trousers, sandals, and a sombrero or head hankerchief. Of course, battlefield scavenging would alter their appearance.

Also, to what degree did Spanish forces in Mexcio dress similarly to the Peninsular Spanish forces? Would their uniforms have been somewhat behind the times, given that Spain was coping with a French invasion at this time, and new uniforms for Mexico were probably not a priority?

Good question. It's possible that the Spanish forces in Mexico would've had an ample clothing stock, and then modified by local tailors to try and match what was worn back home, not to mention suit the climate. For starters, the round hat would certainly be a logical choice in clothing in the hot deserts and summers of Nueva Espaņa. Remember, when the French were in Mexico in the 1860s, they modified their uniform, so much so, that it was practically distinguishable from their European counterpart.

Great questions, Corkonian! thumbs up

Warbeads Inactive Member22 Apr 2009 2:24 p.m. PST

Babel fish does a decent enough translation of the web site.

I am using it to overcome my limitaitons in Spanish.

Had few laughs on the first page but most of it was fairly clear. I really, really need to get my reading fluency back to at least where it was in the 1960s…I realised how much I have lost since that decade.

Saving it off to Word but the first webpage translation ran to 15 pages…

Gracias,

Glenn

deleted Inactive Member23 Apr 2009 7:03 p.m. PST

There are quite a few sources available now on Spanish forces in South America during the wars of revolution from 1800 to about 1825; it is reasonable to assume that Spanish units in Mexico experienced the same style and variety of uniforms, ranging from a few units still in pre-1807 uniforms, to those wearing post-1815 versions.

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